Why Does Coeur de Xocolat have a x

X has been a signature for kisses for years and probably one of the best answers to how it came about is in ancient Rome on legal/government documents the people of Rome would put an x and then kiss it to show they were sincere.

When did it start?

Valentine's Day has lots of shaggy dog stories around its beginnings with the most romantic dating back to the time of the Roman Empire during the reign of Claudius II, 270 AD.

Valentine's Day History

Claudius didn't want men to marry during wartime because he thought single men made better soldiers. Bishop Valentine went against his wishes and performed secret wedding ceremonies. For this, Valentine was jailed and then executed by order of the Emperor on February 14. While in jail, he wrote a love note to the jailor's daughter signing it, "From your Valentine." Sound familiar?

  • The ancient Romans celebrated the Feast of Lupercalia on February 14th in honour of Juno, the queen of the Roman gods and goddesses. Juno was also the goddess of women and marriage.
  • Many believe the 'X' symbol became synonymous with the kiss in medieval times. People who couldn't write their names signed in front of a witness with an 'X.' The 'X' was then kissed to show their sincerity.
  • Girls of medieval times ate bizarre foods on St. Valentine's Day to make them dream of their future spouse.
  • In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who would be their Valentine. They would wear this name pinned onto their sleeves for one week for everyone to see. This was the origin of the expression "to wear your heart on your sleeve."
  • In 1537, England's King Henry VII officially declared February 14th the holiday of St. Valentine's Day.
  • The oldest surviving valentine dates from 1415. It is a poem written by Charles, Duke of Orleans to his wife. At the time, the duke was being held in the Tower of London following his capture at the Battle of Agincourt.

Chocolate

  • Montezuma drank 50 cups of chocolate before entering his harem of 100 wives
  • Casanova, well known as "The World's Greatest Lover," ate chocolate to make him virile.
  • French Physicians of the 1800's commonly would prescribe chocolate for ladies with a broken heart.
  • Chocolate was widely used in Catholic countries after 1569 when Pope Pius V declared that Chocolate (the drink) did not break the fast -- despite the hearty nutritional aspects of Chocolate. Every Pope for 190 years after him, from Gregory XIII to Benedict XIV affirmed this decision
  • Richard Cadbury produced the first box of chocolates for Valentine's Day in the late 1860's.
  • More than 35 million heart-shaped boxes of chocolate will be sold for Valentine's Day.

Flowers

  • 73% of people who buy flowers for Valentine's Day are men, while only 27 Percent are women.
  • 15% of women send themselves flowers on Valentine's Day.

Roses

  • The red rose was the favourite flower of Venus, the Roman goddess of love.
  • Red roses are considered the flower of love because the colour red stands for strong romantic feelings.
  • Approximately 110 million roses, mostly red, will be sold and delivered within the three-day Valentine's Day time period.

Greeting Cards

  • Approximately one billion Valentines are sent out worldwide
  • In Victorian times, it was considered bad luck to sign a Valentine’s Day card.
  • Women purchase approximately 85 percent of all Valentines.
  • Teachers will receive the most Valentine's Day cards, followed by children, mothers, wives, sweethearts and pets.

Fun facts about Valentine's Day

  • Traditionally, spring begins on St Valentine's Day (February 14th), the day on which birds chose their mates. In parts of Sussex Valentines Day was called 'the Birds' Wedding Day'.
  • In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who would be their Valentine. They would wear this name pinned onto their sleeves for one week for everyone to see. This was the origin of the expression “to wear your heart on your sleeve.”
  • In addition to the United Kingdom Valentine's Day is celebrated in, United States, Canada, Mexico, France, Australia, Denmark, and Italy.
  • The most fantastic gift of love is the Taj Mahal in India. It was built by Mughal Emperor Shahjahan as a memorial to his wife.
  • Every Valentine's Day, the Italian city of Verona, where Shakespeare's lovers Romeo and Juliet lived, receives about 1,000 letters addressed to Juliet.
  • About 3% of pet owners will give Valentine's Day gifts to their pets.
  • the first man an unmarried woman saw on 14th February would be her future husband;
  • If the names of all a girl's suitors were written on paper and wrapped in clay and the clay put into water, the piece that rose to the surface first would contain the name of her husband-to-be.
  • If a woman saw a robin flying overhead on Valentine’s Day, it meant she would marry a sailor. If she saw a sparrow, she would marry a poor man and be very happy. If she saw a goldfinch, she would marry a rich person.
  • In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who their valentines would be. They would wear these names on their sleeves for one week.
  • In Wales wooden love spoons were carved and given as gifts on February 14th. Hearts, keys and keyholes were favourite decorations on the spoons. The decoration meant, "You unlock my heart!"
  • Children dressed up as adults on Valentine's Day. They went singing from home to home. One verse they sang was:
    •  Good morning to you, valentine;
      Curl your locks as I do mine ---
      Two before and three behind.
      Good morning to you, valentine.
  • In some countries, a young woman may receive a gift of clothing from a young man. If she keeps the gift, it means she will marry him.
  • A love seat is a wide chair. It was first made to seat one woman and her wide dress. Later, the love seat or courting seat had two sections, often in an S-shape. In this way, a couple could sit together -- but not too closely!
  • Think of five or six names of boys or girls you might marry, As you twist the stem of an apple, recite the names until the stem comes off. You will marry the person whose name you were saying when the stem fell off.
  • Pick a dandelion that has gone to seed. Take a deep breath and blow the seeds into the wind. Count the seeds that remain on the stem. That is the number of children you will have.
  • If you cut an apple in half and count how many seeds are inside, you will also know how many children you will have.

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